Technical Luddite

3,781 notes &

http://clientsfromhell.net/post/92731393105/our-development-team-was-working-on-a-content

clientsfromhell:

Our development team was working on a content management system for a corporate client. It was a big system that administered units produced in a variety of languages and applications and, as a result, required careful user interface design and a lot of backend code.

We were doing a show and…

Explaining why something takes long to develop can be tricky to communicate with people who only see the surface, the completed result.

133 notes &

moviecode:

In Castle Season 4, Episode 16 “Linchpin”, the CIA’s computers have been infected by a virus. The CIA agent is looking for the virus “subroutine” (actual words) injected in their code, with a Matrix-like background, when suddenly, a JavaScript tutorial from Quackit.com that’s used to explain how to display  popups is identified as the so-called “virus subroutine”.

Hilarious.

moviecode:

In Castle Season 4, Episode 16 “Linchpin”, the CIA’s computers have been infected by a virus. The CIA agent is looking for the virus “subroutine” (actual words) injected in their code, with a Matrix-like background, when suddenly, a JavaScript tutorial from Quackit.com that’s used to explain how to display  popups is identified as the so-called “virus subroutine”.

Hilarious.

33 notes &

transitmaps:

Tutorial: Applying a Stroke BEHIND Type in Adobe Illustrator
Let me preface this tutorial by saying that — without a shadow of a doubt — this is my number one most favourite, time-saving, map-making Adobe Illustrator trick ever.
When making transit maps, it’s preferable — for both aesthetics and readability — to not have any labels overlay a route line or other elements. However, sometimes it’s simply unavoidable, as in the detail of my Boston MBTA map redesign at the top of the image above (circled in blue). When you absolutely have to overlay type over another element, it’s a good idea to separate it from that element with a stroke (or “keyline”) around the type that’s the same colour as your map’s background (often white with transit maps).
"Well, that’s easy," I hear you say, "I’ll just duplicate the text, put the copy behind the original and apply a stroke to that duplicate!" 
That’s well and good for isolated examples, but what if you’ve got lots of text that you need to do this to? Or what if you make a typo in the label? Using this method, you’d have to correct it twice - once for each duplicate of the label.
There’s a better way to do it: you just need to know one little trick.
STEP ONE above shows a typical text label and Illustrator’s Appearance palette (Window menu > Appearance or Shift-F6). Note that the text is made up of a black fill with no stroke: the standard appearance for text.
In STEP TWO, I’ve applied a 2-point magenta stroke to the text (You’d probably want to use the same stroke colour as the background of your map; I’ve just used magenta to make the effect easier to see). The stroke sits on top of the fill in the stacking order, and — try as you might — can’t be demoted to sit underneath the fill, where we want it to be: note how the visibility icons for each are greyed out, meaning they can’t be moved. Strangely, the stacking order of text fills and strokes cannot be changed in Illustrator.
(If you’ve ever tried to add a stroke to a text object in Illustrator before, this is where you’ve probably given up in disgust.)
So, here’s the good bit.
In STEP THREE, I’ve drawn a rectangle and given it the fill and stroke that we want the text to eventually have: a black fill and a 2-point magenta stroke. I also like to give my stroke corners a round join — it softens the stroke a little and generally looks better than a mitre join.
Unlike type objects, the stacking order for normal objects or paths is editable, so — while the rectangle is selected — drag the stroke below the path in the Appearance palette. The stroke will now sit behind the fill on the actual rectangle.
STEP FOUR: Open the Graphic Styles palette (Window menu > Graphic Styles or Shift-F5) and drag the rectangle into the palette. You’ve just made a graphic style out of the attributes of the rectangle (stacking order included), which you can now apply to other objects with just a couple of clicks. If you like, give it a descriptive name: I’ve called mine “Keylined Type”.
STEP FIVE: Delete the rectangle: it’s done its work. Select the label text, then click on your newly created “Keylined Text” graphic style. The label now has a stroke that sits behind the fill, just where we want it, as STEP SIX shows in the Appearance palette. Even better, the fill and stroke are now fully adjustable and editable — change the colour, stroke width, or even move the stroke back above the fill!
For new labels that need to look the same, you can either duplicate the one you’ve just made, or simply type the label and then apply the graphic style as needed. No more typing text labels twice, just because you need a keyline around it!
P.S. If you like this tip, or any others that I’ve posted under the "tutorial" tag, please feel free to reblog or tweet about it — let’s share the knowledge!

transitmaps:

Tutorial: Applying a Stroke BEHIND Type in Adobe Illustrator

Let me preface this tutorial by saying that — without a shadow of a doubt — this is my number one most favourite, time-saving, map-making Adobe Illustrator trick ever.

When making transit maps, it’s preferable — for both aesthetics and readability — to not have any labels overlay a route line or other elements. However, sometimes it’s simply unavoidable, as in the detail of my Boston MBTA map redesign at the top of the image above (circled in blue). When you absolutely have to overlay type over another element, it’s a good idea to separate it from that element with a stroke (or “keyline”) around the type that’s the same colour as your map’s background (often white with transit maps).

"Well, that’s easy," I hear you say, "I’ll just duplicate the text, put the copy behind the original and apply a stroke to that duplicate!" 

That’s well and good for isolated examples, but what if you’ve got lots of text that you need to do this to? Or what if you make a typo in the label? Using this method, you’d have to correct it twice - once for each duplicate of the label.

There’s a better way to do it: you just need to know one little trick.

STEP ONE above shows a typical text label and Illustrator’s Appearance palette (Window menu > Appearance or Shift-F6). Note that the text is made up of a black fill with no stroke: the standard appearance for text.

In STEP TWO, I’ve applied a 2-point magenta stroke to the text (You’d probably want to use the same stroke colour as the background of your map; I’ve just used magenta to make the effect easier to see). The stroke sits on top of the fill in the stacking order, and — try as you might — can’t be demoted to sit underneath the fill, where we want it to be: note how the visibility icons for each are greyed out, meaning they can’t be moved. Strangely, the stacking order of text fills and strokes cannot be changed in Illustrator.

(If you’ve ever tried to add a stroke to a text object in Illustrator before, this is where you’ve probably given up in disgust.)

So, here’s the good bit.

In STEP THREE, I’ve drawn a rectangle and given it the fill and stroke that we want the text to eventually have: a black fill and a 2-point magenta stroke. I also like to give my stroke corners a round join — it softens the stroke a little and generally looks better than a mitre join.

Unlike type objects, the stacking order for normal objects or paths is editable, so — while the rectangle is selected — drag the stroke below the path in the Appearance palette. The stroke will now sit behind the fill on the actual rectangle.

STEP FOUR: Open the Graphic Styles palette (Window menu > Graphic Styles or Shift-F5) and drag the rectangle into the palette. You’ve just made a graphic style out of the attributes of the rectangle (stacking order included), which you can now apply to other objects with just a couple of clicks. If you like, give it a descriptive name: I’ve called mine “Keylined Type”.

STEP FIVE: Delete the rectangle: it’s done its work. Select the label text, then click on your newly created “Keylined Text” graphic style. The label now has a stroke that sits behind the fill, just where we want it, as STEP SIX shows in the Appearance palette. Even better, the fill and stroke are now fully adjustable and editable — change the colour, stroke width, or even move the stroke back above the fill!

For new labels that need to look the same, you can either duplicate the one you’ve just made, or simply type the label and then apply the graphic style as needed. No more typing text labels twice, just because you need a keyline around it!

P.S. If you like this tip, or any others that I’ve posted under the "tutorial" tag, please feel free to reblog or tweet about it — let’s share the knowledge!

0 notes &

Album Artist column for foobar2000

So, I’ve went to all this trouble, and discovered that I’ve basically just reproduced what the Artist/Album and Track/Artist columns do, for the most part. Basically, it’s a pair of macros to help sort Various Artist albums in foobar2000, based on comparing the album artist and track artist.

Mine differ from foobar’s default column in two ways that I can see: using Ω pushes all of the Various Artist albums to the bottom, and using the comparison keeps the Album Artist column out of the title when it’s the same as the Artist.

Artist / Album

$if($stricmp(%album artist%,%artist%),%artist / %album%,Ω / %album%)

Displays ‘Ω / Album Name’ when the Album Artist is different from the Track Artist, otherwise ‘Artist / Album Name’. The Ω character is used because it sorts after Z, so Various Artist albums will appear after the single artist albums (that is, unless you have a lot of music with greek characters).

Track Title

$if($stricmp(%album artist%,%artist%),%title%,%artist% / %title%)

Displays ‘Track Artist / Title’ when the Album Artist is different, otherwise just ‘Title’. 

Using these two columns, you can sort based solely on Track Number and Artist / Album, and have all albums sorted correctly in track order (with all of the Various Artist albums at the very bottom), while still displaying the Track Artist information when it makes sense.

Example sorting

  • !!! / THR!!!ER - 02 - Get That Rhythm Right
  • !!! / THR!!!ER - 03 - One Girl / One Boy
  • Air Marshal Landing / You Used To Be Me - 05 - Little Town
  • Bat For Lashes / Haunted - 04 - Laura
  • Bat For Lashes / Haunted - 08 - Marilyn
  • Ω / FZ: Side F - 02 - Datasette / Glitch
  • Ω / FZ: Side F - 05 - Jay Tholen / The Impartation
  • Ω / World 1-2 - 08 - Eirik Suhrke / Corrosion Jam
  • Ω / World 1-2 - 09 - Keiji Yamagishi / Memories of T

One small pitfall I’ve found: the fields will include whitespace when comparing, including any whitespace after the comma in say, an if statement. So, $stricmp(%album artist%, %artist%) will only return true if the %album artist% is the %artist% with an initial space! $stricmp(%album artist%,%artist%) is what you’re really after.

Filed under foobar2000

0 notes &

Refresh data source in Crystal Reports

Google-fu results: a long rambly rant about Crystal Reports.

The relevant bit: In the main menu, click Database, then Verify Database. After you’ve re-entered any parameters, it will check if any columns have been changed or added, and prompt you accordingly.

I also find Crystal Reports quite frustrating (really? no automatic tables? no distributing? no vertical text alignment?), but I’m not sure it’s any more helpful to bury advice in a giant rant.

Filed under crystal reports datasource view stored procedure refresh columns

0 notes &

Remote Session only shows top left hand corner

I first noticed the problem with Go To Meeting, but I’ve also seen it when using Kayako OnSite, which leads me to believe that it’s more of an OS problem - when you connect to certain clients, the view appears ‘zoomed-in’, and only shows the top-left hand corner of the client’s screen. Messing with resolution doesn’t help.

I did find a ticket on the Go To Meeting website, and this actually contained the solution (although I didn’t believe it at the time, and it was actually the client that ended up figuring it out).

Change the Size of All Items is the culprit, a setting introduced in Windows 7, and also it seems included in Windows 8 which has been a part of Windows since forever, but has only recently bubbled to a place where typical users will come across it. I changed it to Smaller just in case, but it’s possible that setting it to Medium is also OK. But if it’s set to Larger, then you’ll get the problem I’ve seen.

Filed under windows 7 windows 8 ui user interface remote connection go to meeting kayako